Bobsled Preview
Four medals highlighted the Olympic Winter Games Sochi 2014 for the U.S. Bobsled Team. As the squad readies itself for its next Olympic chapter in 2018, it will look to build on Steven Holcomb's bronze medals in both two-man and four-man, as well as Elana Meyers Taylor's silver and Jamie Greubel Poser's bronze in the women's discipline. MORE
Nick Cunningham
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Hometown: Monterey, California
OIympic Experience: 2010, 2014
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A sergeant in the U.S. Army, Nick Cunningham began bobsledding in 2008 and was immediately selected as an alternate for the world cup team. His background as a track and field athlete at Boise State University served him well. Just 18 months after his introduction to the sport, he was headed to Vancouver for the 2010 Olympic Winter Games. There, he placed 12th in the two-man and 13th in the four-man. Following his Olympic debut, Cunningham switched from the brakeman to pilot position, where he remained for his second Olympic Games in which he once again earned a pair of top-15 finishes. After the sudden, tragic loss of three-time Olympic medalist Steven Holcomb in May 2017, Cunningham is among a group of talented pilots who are battling for one of the open spots in time for the 2018 Olympics in PyeongChang.
About Nick
Something quirky: I love cooking. Food always tastes better when effort is put into it. Being from the Central Coast of California, I am torn between Tri-Tip and Salmon. I love cooking both and I really love eating both.

Nickname(s): Nicho- pronounced like Nicko. Its short for Nicholas but more than the common "Nick."

Hobbies: I enjoy watching and playing football, surfing and going to the rodeo.

Best advice received: My mom gave me the most cliché and best piece of advice. She told me to just have fun. Every day, I strive to be the best teammate, soldier and son that I can be.

Earliest Olympic memory: I still get chills thinking about it. It was in 2010 when I could call my parents from St. Moritz, Switzerland, to let them know "We did it. We qualified." I say "we" because they sacrificed just as much, if not more, to let me chase my dreams of being an Olympian.

Earliest memory of sport: Taking my very first run down the bobsled track, then 18 months later walking in my first Opening Ceremony.

Aja Evans
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Hometown: Chicago, Illinois
Olympic Experience: 2014 (1 bronze)
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Olympic bronze medalist Aja Evans began her athletic career as a track and field athlete in college, but blasted onto the sliding scene in 2012. During her rookie season, she scored 794 out of a possible 800 points on the combine test, winning the 2012 U.S. National Push Championship title and breaking the start record with driver Jamie Greubel Poser in the 2012-13 team selection races. By 2014, Evans was headed to the Olympic Winter Games in Sochi, Russia, where she earned bronze in the with Greubel Poser. Following her Olympic debut, she began training to compete in track and field at the Rio 2016 Olympic Games, though a knee injury derailed her hopes to compete. She had fully recovered in time for the 2016 U.S. National Push Championships, once again proving to be the fastest female brakeman at the event. After regaining a spot on the 2016-17 U.S. national team, she claimed five podium finishes in six world cup races. With another bronze-medal finish behind Greubel Poser at the 2017 World Championships, the pair is poised to make another run for the Olympic podium in 2018.
About Aja
Something quirky: I have a weird fascination with aliens and Bigfoot.

Best advice received: My mother telling me, "You better go back up that hill and try again."

Earliest Olympic memory: Every four years, my family would watch the Summer Olympics and specifically watch the track and field events. I always imagined myself a sprinter.
Jamie Greubel Poser
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Hometown: Newton, Pennsylvania
OIympic Experience: 2014 (1 bronze)
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Already an Olympic bronze medalist, Jamie Greubel Poser will look to return to the Olympic stage for Team USA and improve on her third-place finish from 2014. The former Cornell University track and field athlete began sliding for the U.S. national team during the 2007-08 season. After beginning her bobsled career as a brakeman, she opted to become a driver and has emerged as one of the nation's most promising women's pilots. She teamed with Emily Azevedo to earn her first world cup medal – a silver – during the 2012-13 season, and went on to claim the 2014 Olympic bronze medal a year later with Aja Evans. A stellar 2015-16 season saw her earn six medals in seven world cup races and finish second overall in the world cup rankings. She continued her success the following season, winning five medals in six world cup events and claiming bronze at the 2017 World Championships alongside Evans.
About Jamie
Hidden talent: Most of my talents are what I call human tricks. I can whistle extremely loud, make a clover shape with my tongue, and I can make a lot of different noises (bike horn, dog bark, ape screech, elephant trumpet).

Something quirky: I get the hiccups when I laugh too hard, and my middle name is Hilda.

Nickname: Dragon, Blonde Dragon, Diesel
Kehri Jones
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Hometown: Killeen, Texas
2018 Olympic hopeful
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After a strong track and field career at Baylor University, Kehri Jones was introduced to sliding by Elana Meyers Taylor. A native of central Texas, Jones may not have grown up in snow, but nonetheless emerged as one of the best at her first rookie push camp. In her first competition with Meyers Taylor, the pair took second at the 2015 U.S. push championships. After splitting time between the sleds of Meyers Taylor and Katie Eberling during the 2015-16 season, Jones partnered full-time with Meyers Taylor for the 2016-17 season to win two gold medals and one silver on the world cup circuit. The dynamic duo has continued to rise in the international rankings, winning gold and breaking the track start record at the 2017 World Championships in Koenigsse, Germany. She will look to make her first Olympic team in 2018, with her sights set on an even more lofty goal of winning the Olympic gold medal in 2018.
About Kehri
Something quirky: I am an avid car singer. When my songs come on, I turn the music up really loud so I can't hear myself and sing my heart out.

Nickname: Pocket Rocket or Little Miss Dynamite. That's what the bobsled commentators call me because I'm one of the smallest brakemen in the sport.

If not an athlete: I would be working in the healthcare field. My passion is helping people regain or continue wellness.
Steve Langton
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Hometown: Melrose, Massachusetts
Olympic Experience: 2010 (1 bronze), 2014 (1 bronze)
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A veteran of the U.S. bobsled team, Steven Langton looks to make his third Olympic team in 2018. After a college career in sprinting and jumping, he discovered bobsledding in 2007. He went on to earn rookie of the year honors in 2008 and won the U.S. men's national push title in 2009. By 2010, he was making his Olympic debut at the Vancouver Games. A crash in the four-man prevented Olympic glory, but propelled him to continue training and improving. In 2012, he teamed with pilot Steven Holcomb to become a world champion in both the two-man and four-man events, making history as the first American team to win both titles at the same world championships. In 2014, he returned to the Olympic stage, where he claimed a pair of bronze medals in the four-man and the two-man, helping end a 62-year medal drought for the Americans. After a two-year retirement, he returned to the sport in 2017 and reclaimed the title as the U.S. men's national push champion. With such a triumphant return, it comes as no surprise that he has been dubbed the "Push Track Hero" by his teammates. Considered by Steve Holcomb to be the "best push athlete in the world," Langton hopes to push his way to his third Olympic berth and another podium finish in 2018.
About Steve
Something quirky: I competed on The Amazing Race with Team USA short track speedskater Aly Dudek after the 2014 Olympic Winter Games.

Fun fact: My brother, Chris, also represented Team USA at the 2014 Olympic Winter Games as an alternate in bobsled.

Hobbies: Watching Game of Thrones, fishing, hiking, traveling, spending time with family and studying real estate.

Three words to describe you: Determined, spontaneous and passionate.

Earliest Olympic memory: I remember watching the 2006 Olympic Winter Games and being inspired to give it a shot.

Earliest memory of sport: My rookie season in 2008 and winning my first gold medal in two-man bobsled in Lake Placid.
Elana Meyers Taylor
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Hometown: Douglasville, Georgia
Olympic Experience: 2010 (1 bronze), 2014 (1 silver)
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One of the most decorated women's bobsled pilots in history, Elana Meyers Taylor has overcome several injuries since the Sochi Olympics and is seeking her third Olympic medal in PyeongChang. A former collegiate and professional softball athlete, she began competing in bobsled in 2007, making the U.S. national team during her rookie season. She pushed her way to her first world cup podium in 2008, earning a bronze medal with driver Shauna Rohbock. She went on to win her first world cup gold medal in Whistler, British Columbia, and claim silver at the 2009 World Championships in Lake Placid, New York. After earning bronze at the 2010 Olympics in Vancouver, she transitioned from the push position to driving – a move that would set the course for the future of women's bobsled in the U.S. Since then, she has claimed five world championships medals, most recently winning gold in 2017 with Kehri Jones. Should she make the 2018 U.S. Olympic Team, she will look to add an Olympic gold medal to her already impressive resume after taking bronze and silver in 2010 and 2014.
About Elana
Hidden talent: I play the saxophone.

Something quirky: I cannot carry a tune, but I'm not afraid to belt out a song in my car. I also like to listen to podcasts, even on economics.

Earliest Olympic memory: My earliest memory of seeing bobsled was the 2002 Winter Olympics. I saw Vonetta Flowers win gold and thought it was really amazing that a person who looked like me was succeeding in the Winter Olympics.
Justin Olsen
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Hometown: San Antonio, Texas
Olympic Experience: 2010 (1 gold), 2014
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A former collegiate football player, Justin Olsen began sliding in 2007 and made the U.S. world cup team during his rookie season. The following year, he found success pushing for Steve Holcomb's sled in both the two- and four-man events. The 2008-09 season saw him rack up numerous podium finishes on the North American Cup and world cup tours, culminating in a world championship gold medal in the four-man event. The win was a prelude to another world title that would come in 2010, when Olsen aided Holcomb's "Night Train" four-man sled to Olympic gold in Vancouver. After pushing with Nick Cunningham's four-man team at the Sochi 2014 Olympic Winter Games, he switched to the front of the sled, making his driving debut in 2015. Since then, he has emerged as one of Team USA's top young pilots, earning several North American Cup medals before making his world cup debut as a driver during the 2016-17 season. In his first world championship appearance in the front seat, he placed 11th in both the four-man and two-man events. Following the sudden, tragic death of Holcomb in May 2017, Olsen is among a talented group of up-and-comping pilots that will look to claim one of the open driver slots in the lead up to the 2018 Olympics.
About Justin
Best advice received: Try not to get caught up with what everyone else is doing.

Nickname: Steve Langton calls me Big Tex and Jim Carriel calls me Lil Tex.

If not an athlete: I would like to see if I have what it takes to be Army Special Forces.
Carlo Valdes
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Hometown: Newport Beach, California
2018 Olympic Hopeful
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Carlo Valdes was a collegiate wide receiver, decathlete and javelin thrower at the University of California, Los Angeles before being introduced to bobsled by former UCLA teammate Andreas Drbal in 2014. Despite breaking his toe after his national push championship debut, he had a strong performance at trials and earned a spot on the U.S. national team. In his first month of competition, he pushed his way to podium finishes in three of his six North American Cup races. He went on to compete on the world cup circuit that same season and was voted USA Bobsled & Skeleton's bobsled rookie of the year. Since joining the world cup circuit, he has earned six podium finishes across the two- and four-man events. He concluded the 2016-17 season on a high note by placing fifth in the four-man event and seventh in the two-man sled at the world championships in Konigssee, Germany. Preparing to enter his third world cup season, he has his sights set on making his first Olympic team with the chance to make an impact for Team USA in PyeongChang.
About Carlo
Something quirky: I enjoy growing my facial hair into funky looks. I also love to do karaoke.

Earliest Olympic memory: I remember watching Michael Johnson win gold in the 200m and 400m with his golden shoes at the 96 Olympics.

Best advice received: Control what you can control.
Evan Weinstock
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Hometown: Las Vegas, Nevada
2018 Olympic Hopeful
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Evan Weinstock, a former collegiate decathlete at Brown University, first began sliding in 2015. He broke onto the scene with a first-place finish in his professional debut at the North American Cup in Calgary, Alberta, behind pilot Codie Bascue. Since then he has continued to impress, adding six podium finishes on the North American Cup circuit over the past two seasons. In 2016, he earned the USA Bobsled & Skeleton's MVP Award after making his world cup debut in only his second season. Teaming with pilot Justin Olsen, he capped the 2016-17 season with 11th-place finishes in both the two- and four-man events at the 2017 World Championships. Now with two seasons under his belt, he will turn his focus to making his first Olympic appearance in 2018.
About Evan
Best advice received: Try not to get caught up with what everyone else is doing.

Nickname: Steve Langton calls me Big Tex and Jim Carriel calls me Lil Tex.

If not an athlete: I would like to see if I have what it takes to be Army Special Forces.
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